Asking the right questions

Utilizing assessment tools to help identify goals and begin conversations surrounding technology.

Assessments for remote monitoring—and technology in general—help teams ask the right questions to identify goals and outcomes technology may assist with. Most technology service vendors and many service providers have their own assessment process to help fine tune outcomes and recommend specific tool options. The following basic questions are a good place to start the conversation:

  1. What is/are the thing(s) the person wants to do with less caregiver intervention?
    Do they want to live in their own home with less staff; be in their own room without staff checking in all the time; get to work; take medications; choose and make their own food; etc.
  2. What are the risks/vulnerabilities if the person did this without or with reduced caregiver intervention?
    What would the caregiver need to know to be comfortable NOT being physically present?
  3. What prompts, tools, or support would the person need to help him/her manage this without having a caregiver physically present all the time?
    Identify only what you want the tool to do at this point; not the technology solution. For example, prompt to take meds, if hasn’t done so; prompt if not out of bed by 7:00 and notify caregiver if not out by 7:30; identify possible falls; prompt or turn off stove, if left unattended.

Assessment templates are included in the Technology Resource Library as examples. The Ohio Remote Monitoring Assessment and Instructions was developed and has been used in Ohio to help teams consider and discuss when remote supervision for a person or group might be appropriate and what the needs are. The Hammer Residences’ Person Centered Technology Support Addendum is used to consider assistive technology on a broader scale. Ohio and Hammer Residences’, Inc. have given their permission for others to use and adapt these tools to meet individual needs.

Visit the Resource Library to review additional tools that may be used to help begin the conversation.

 

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